sometimes I'm tremendous

Ask me stuff   stuff what fascinates me, including doctor who, sherlock bbc, simon amstell, black books, writing, poetry, & other things that catch my magpie-eye.

twitter.com/HeyJaneyFord:

    kittehkats:

    sizvideos:

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    We are far too comfortable with thinking of life as disposable.

    (via fuckyeahkitties)

    — 20 hours ago with 227285 notes
    #catses 

    You are a brave girl. I’m so lucky to have seen you grow.

    (Source: ofmotionpictures, via rob-anybody)

    — 3 days ago with 3263 notes
    #mako mori  #pacific rim 
    Sonya & Marco search for Kyle and Eleanor; Ray gets on the wrong end of Fausto Galvan; Linder returns.

At El Paso PD, Kitty the fun receptionist offers Marco “one of those air mattress thingies” and an omelet in the morning (Kitty, do not get involved with Marco).  But instead Marco decides to spend his night drinking fancy rye whiskey with Hank.  When Hank offers to let Marco see Eva, “I’d rather not,” Marco says quickly, explaining he’s being followed.  He doesn’t want his corrupt colleagues (or, I would guess, Fausto Galvan’s goons) to find out about the Ranch of Sexy Endangered Women overseen by Pastor Killed-a-Guy.  
"I could use your perspective," Hank says, asking Marco to take on investigating the case with Sonya.  I assume Marco feels guilty about allegedly helping his friends while doing undercover dirty work for a drug cartel leader.  But I honestly have NO IDEA, because it seems like the show would rather focus on Eleanor the Freaking Terrifying Former Mennonite’s rapturous masochism instead of what the hell is going on inside the head of one of our main characters.

Read the rest of my recap and come talk to me about The Bridge 2.03 - Sorrowsworn over at HDJM!

    Sonya & Marco search for Kyle and Eleanor; Ray gets on the wrong end of Fausto Galvan; Linder returns.

    At El Paso PD, Kitty the fun receptionist offers Marco “one of those air mattress thingies” and an omelet in the morning (Kitty, do not get involved with Marco).  But instead Marco decides to spend his night drinking fancy rye whiskey with Hank.  When Hank offers to let Marco see Eva, “I’d rather not,” Marco says quickly, explaining he’s being followed.  He doesn’t want his corrupt colleagues (or, I would guess, Fausto Galvan’s goons) to find out about the Ranch of Sexy Endangered Women overseen by Pastor Killed-a-Guy.  

    "I could use your perspective," Hank says, asking Marco to take on investigating the case with Sonya.  I assume Marco feels guilty about allegedly helping his friends while doing undercover dirty work for a drug cartel leader.  But I honestly have NO IDEA, because it seems like the show would rather focus on Eleanor the Freaking Terrifying Former Mennonite’s rapturous masochism instead of what the hell is going on inside the head of one of our main characters.

    Read the rest of my recap and come talk to me about The Bridge 2.03 - Sorrowsworn over at HDJM!

    — 4 days ago
    #the bridge fx  #marco ruiz  #sonya cross  #eleanor nacht  #the bridge  #demian bichir  #diane kruger  #franka potente  #sorrowsworn  #recaps  #hdjm  #the bridge spoilers 

    mashable:

    The Ultimate World Cup 2014 Highlights (Cat Edition)

    This is your World Cup recap. And by “recap,” we mean cats playing soccer. (Oops! We mean “football”, fancy people.) 

    (via lookatthislittlething)

    — 4 days ago with 3428 notes
    #soccer  #football  #catses 

    Los Angeles Times portraits - 2014 (x)

    (via rob-anybody)

    — 5 days ago with 3986 notes
    #sleepy hollow  #nicole beharie  #tom mison 

    chiltonomics:

    the-girl-without-ed:

    nothing says hope quite like flowers growing through the cracks in concrete

    beauty can rise from ashes

    image

    (Source: jonnovstheinternet, via essieincinci)

    — 6 days ago with 286529 notes
    #flowers  #glimpses of beauty 
    We need to talk about Anne Frank

    historicity-was-already-taken:

    As of this writing, John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars has sold over one million copies, and holds a place on several bestseller lists. The film adaptation of the book has made over two hundred million dollars in the domestic and foreign market. The book and the movie tell the story of two terminally ill American teenagers, and both contain a scene where the protagonists, Hazel and Augustus, share a kiss in the Anne Frank House. John Green made the following statement regarding the scene:

    “Anne Frank was a pretty good example of a young person who ended up having the kind of heroic arc that Augustus wants—she was remembered and she left this mark that he thinks is valuable—but when he has to confront her death, he has to confront the reality that really she was robbed of the opportunity to live or die for something. She just died of illness like most people. And so I wanted him to go with a sort of expectation of her heroism and be sort of dashed.”

    Here, Green makes it clear that he reads Anne Frank’s death as being from an illness like “most people,” like his protagonist. In doing so, he erases the circumstances under which she contracted typhus. “Most people” are not Ashkenazic Jewish teenage girls who contracted typhus in a concentration camp during the Holocaust. This fundamental erasure of the context of her death allowed him, those involved in the cinematic adaptation, and yes, a large portion of his readership, to accept the use of Anne Frank and her death as a prop in this American YA love story. Indeed, when further called on the issue, Green stated:

    “I’ve been getting this question a lot. I can’t speak for the movie, obviously, as I didn’t make it, but as for the book: The Fault in Our Stars was the first non-documentary feature film to be granted access to the Anne Frank House precisely because the House’s board of directors and curators liked that scene in the novel a great deal. (A spokesperson recently said, ‘In the book it is a moving and sensitively handled scene.’) Abraham H. Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League and a Holocaust survivor, had this to say: ‘The kissing scene in ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ in the annex of the Anne Frank House is not offensive or against who Anne Frank was. What Anne communicated in her diary was hope. She celebrated life and she celebrated hope.’ Obviously, the Anne Frank House and the ADL do not have a monopoly on Anne’s life or her legacy, but their opinions are important to me.”

    I take issue with this response. Here, Green is divesting himself of responsibility for the scene, and communicating to his critics that he is not to blame, because the Anne Frank House board of directors, curators, and a Holocaust survivor approved of it. In other words, he is drawing these peoples’ assumed authority to silence criticism, and to avoid taking responsibility for the filmed version of a scene he created.

    The Anne Frank House, for all the wonderful work it does, is a museum. Like all museums, it must work to attract and reach out to potential patrons. In other words, museums have to advertise because they require patrons and revenues to exist. Therefore, I read the official approval of the Anne Frank House simply as a targeted attempt to reach out to and attract a pool of untapped, younger patrons. They chose to support the filming of a sympathetic romantic scene about terminally ill teenagers in their institution to reach out to young people. While that is a sound business decision, I would argue that it’s hardly an ethical one for the Anne Frank House, an institution devoted, as per their website, to:

    “the preservation of the place where Anne Frank went into hiding during the Second World War, and to bringing the life story of Anne Frank to the attention of as many people as possible worldwide with the aim of raising awareness of the dangers of anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination and the importance of freedom, equal rights and democracy,”

    to support the filming of this scene. For, in Green’s own words, that scene had nothing to do with the context of Anne Frank’s death, and therefore, it did nothing to bring Anne Frank’s story to life. And it hardly raises awareness of contemporary European anti-Semitism.

    As for the ADL, I very much agree with Mr. Foxman’s assessment of Anne Frank. However, what she celebrated in her life and her writings have little to do with what she has come to mean in within public memory of the Holocaust of European Jewry. Her narrative has been used by nations and educational systems to the extent that for many, she is the Holocaust; she is the face of the Holocaust. But what we inherit from her isn’t the experience of the Holocaust. That experience, and her death at Bergen Belsen take place outside the pages of her diary. Readers are never forced to experience the Holocaust through her eyes; they are able to embrace the tragedy of the Holocaust through her story while remaining removed from its experiential realities. Thus, Anne Frank becomes the Holocaust without forcing anyone to experience it. Her name can be invoked to summon tragedy, without forcing anyone to feel it.

    While Anne Frank may be the face of the Holocaust of European Jewry, the memory of the experiential reality of the Holocaust is male. The way we conceptualize and remember the concentration camp experience is constructed by male narratives. More Jewish men survived the Holocaust than Jewish women. Due to attitudes towards education in the interwar period, more male Jewish survivors had the education and literary capital needed to craft enduring narratives of their experiences than did female Jewish survivors. There are three foundational male Holocaust survival narratives: Night by Elie Wiesel, Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi, and Maus by Art Spiegelman about his father’s Holocaust experience. Never have I seen those three men and their narratives used as a joke, or a meme, or a cheap narrative device, or as self-promotion by an American pop star.

    These men are revered, and their narratives taken extremely seriously. And none of them, none of them have been used in a prop in a story about terminally ill gentile American teenagers. They survived, in perhaps the type of heroic arc a John Green protagonist would yearn for. Yet Augustus doesn’t look to them. He doesn’t share a kiss with his girlfriend at Auschwitz. He shared a kiss with her in the Anne Frank House.

    Anne Frank is not a prop. She is not a symbol, she is not a teenager who happened to die of an illness, and she is not one of the canonical Jewish male survivors. She is one of many millions of Jewish women and girls who were industrially murdered like livestock, incinerated, and left in an unmarked grave. That is the story of the Holocaust of European Jewry, and that is the story of the persecution and murder of all Europeans (the disabled, Romani, Irish Travelers, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Communists) who failed to fit into Nazi racial and ideological constructs.

    And we would all do well to remember that.

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    frequently asked questions
    ask historicity-was-already-taken a question

    — 1 week ago with 2021 notes
    #anne frank  #the diary of anne frank  #holocaust erasure  #john green 
    moma:

Degas was born today in 1834. His friend, the American artist Mary Cassatt, was the model for this slice-of-life painting. 

[Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas. At the Milliner’s. c. 1882.]

    moma:

    Degas was born today in 1834. His friend, the American artist Mary Cassatt, was the model for this slice-of-life painting

    [Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas. At the Milliner’s. c. 1882.]

    — 1 week ago with 381 notes
    #edgar degas  #mary cassat  #impressionism  #art  #painting 
    "In the ordinary jumble of my literary drawer, I sometimes find texts I wrote ten, fifteen, or even more years ago. And many of them seem to me written by a stranger: I simply do not recognize myself in them. There was a person who wrote them, and it was I. I experienced them, but it was in another life, from which I just woke up, as if from someone else’s dream."
    Fernando Pessoa (via writingquotes)
    — 1 week ago with 806 notes
    #quotes  #writing 

    sallydonovan:

    SALLY DONOVAN, KID DETECTIVE! Sally, thirteen years old, five foot, quick as a cat and smart as a whip, is the best and most successful kid detective in her district of London. She solves mysteries while acing Year Eight and putting up with her pest of a neighbor, Sherlock Holmes. But she’ll admit it - he’s almost as clever as she is.

    — 1 week ago with 2887 notes
    #sally donovan  #kid au  #bbc sherlock 
    A new crime reunites Sonya and Marco while Eleanor entices a gullible teenage boy. 

"I’m out of here, dude," says the smarter of two teen boys who happen upon Eleanor the Freaking Terrifying Former Mennonite hosing herself down and showing off her boss William Blake back tattoo in the process.  When Eleanor says she’s cold, the obviously completely doomed Kyle gives her his jacket and stands about in gawky awkwardness while Eleanor quizzes him about his state of grace.  "I’ve used up all of mine," she explains.  That can’t be good.  Oh, and she lost her clothes because "there was man blood on them."  Wow.  I am totally going to use that excuse the next time I want someone to leave me alone at the beach.

Read the rest of my recap and come talk to me about The Bridge 2.02 - Ghost of a Flea over at HDJM!

    A new crime reunites Sonya and Marco while Eleanor entices a gullible teenage boy. 

    "I’m out of here, dude," says the smarter of two teen boys who happen upon Eleanor the Freaking Terrifying Former Mennonite hosing herself down and showing off her boss William Blake back tattoo in the process.  When Eleanor says she’s cold, the obviously completely doomed Kyle gives her his jacket and stands about in gawky awkwardness while Eleanor quizzes him about his state of grace.  "I’ve used up all of mine," she explains.  That can’t be good.  Oh, and she lost her clothes because "there was man blood on them."  Wow.  I am totally going to use that excuse the next time I want someone to leave me alone at the beach.

    Read the rest of my recap and come talk to me about The Bridge 2.02 - Ghost of a Flea over at HDJM!

    — 1 week ago with 5 notes
    #the bridge fx  #the bridge  #sonya cross  #marco ruiz  #demian bichir  #diane kruger  #ghost of a flea  #recaps  #hdjm 

    stewarter:

    Favorite movies » Donnie Darko (2001)

    “A storm is coming,” Frank says. “A storm that will swallow the children. And I will deliver them from the kingdom of Bane. I’ll deliver the children back to their doorsteps. I’ll send the monsters back to the underground. I’ll send them back to a place where no one else can see them except for me, ‘cause I am Donnie Darko.”

    — 2 weeks ago with 10663 notes
    #donnie darko